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Are Your Team Coaches Delivering On Your Promises?

One of the biggest reasons enterprise coaching organizations sign up with CoachAccountable is to have better oversight of team coaches. Are your coaches doing what you’ve asked them to? Are they delivering on what you’ve promised your clients?

CoachAccountable helps keep track of your coaching team:

  • Share your content, files, Courses and more with them
  • Set the types and lengths of Appointments each coach can offer
  • Pair coaches with clients, limiting or enabling a coach’s visibility of your entire client roster
  • Approve various permissions, for example to allow more autonomy for head coaches or admin users

And for reporting, you’ve already got several options:

  • Client activity report, which can often be an early indicator of someone who’s struggling and could use a little intervention
  • Appointment reports, which gives a window into appointment hours logged and basic stats
  • Data Lab, where you can run a report on, say, a client satisfaction level question or see trends across clients over time
  • Happenings Report, a regularly scheduled snapshot of interactions

And our newest addition to your team management tools: the Coach Touchpoints Report.

The Coach Touchpoints report allows you to see, at a glance, how often your coaches (or just you yourself!) make contact with every one of their clients. Here’s how to set it up.

You’ll find this in Reports >> Coach Touchpoints.

Generating a Touchpoints Report

The real essence of a Touchpoints report is the date range you’re interested in and what kinds of interactions you want included.  Clicking on the “Include” button reveals the types of interactions that you can choose from.

In this case, for example, we might only care about appointments completed and comments posted.

There are also a few less essential (but handy) settings to be found by clicking the gear icon:

The “Good if”/”Bad if” settings are a little esoteric, but…

For Team Edition accounts, you can choose to include secondarily-paired clients (in addition to primary ones) when visualizing who coaches have (and haven’t) been active with.

The “Good if within” and “Bad if over” settings affect how things are color coded.  Ultimately this report is meant to give a visual look into how often coaches are interacting with clients, and if it’s frequent enough.

The resulting colorful graph will show trends in your interaction with clients, broken down by coach for Team Edition users, or just you if it’s, well, just you.  This can help you keep tabs on how you and/or your coaches are doing, and who might need a little more rigor in their outreach and upkeep.

Let’s take a look at one.

Wow, look at all those touchpoints–that Patrick Leonardo won’t leave John Larson alone!

Notice the setup here: good within three days, bad if over five days. That means that all of these green dashes say “great, this coach has been in contact with this particular client within three days”, red ones say, “whoops, they were finally in contact but it was more than five days since their last connection”, and yellow shows contacts that occurred between three and five days.

Also notice the trails: they show the progression from “we’re fine” to “not so good, it’s now been a while” to “yikes, we’re really letting this client down, interaction-wise!”

Drill Down

From here, you can hover over a date to see what particular interaction(s) occurred on that date.

You can then click on the item in question (a Worksheet, Session Note, etc.) to view it.

Added Bonuses

In the example reports above, you might notice that certain coaches aren’t interacting with certain clients at all. That might be an easy indication to update the coach’s client pairings.

Also, perhaps you’ve got a single coach account, rather than a Team Edition account. You can still use the Coach Touchpoints Report to track your own interactions with clients to see if you’re delivering on your promises. Here’s how it looks for a single coach’s account – notice you’ll see the same indicators as far as “it’s been too long”, “pretty good”, or “great job.”

From here, you can use this data to help train and develop your coaches, give gentle nudges, proactively reach out to clients, and find reasons to acknowledge your coaches, too.


Looking for a good way to manage coaches in your organization? Give the Coach Touchpoints report a try with your free 30-day trial of CoachAccountable.

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